Saturday, 4 February 2012

Generosity, tolerance and good humour ~ taking care of ourselves and each other

What's the point of working so hard on our conflicts, both inner and outer, if the rest of the world is going mad, or simply carries on regardless?  It's not easy, but I still think it's worth it.  Given the choice I much prefer to live as fully as I can.  I more able to do so if I've found the balance within myself that comes from having come to terms with difficulties I've had in the past, and am also regularly doing what I can to contribute to the greater good in practical ways, however small.

The world seems to have become a increasingly dangerous and unstable place, yet there is much good: glorious sunrises, wondrous music, heartening friends, happy events...  

We often hear that in a global context we are all only six people removed from any other person in the world.  This means we are all much more closely connected than it would appear.  If this is so, we can surely make a difference by reaching out to those we do know or come across with at least an attitude of generosity, tolerance and good humour, where we feel confident to do so.  I don't think we have to do this with everyone: people we feel unsafe with will be someone else's friend who can reach out to them.  

I would hope that one way and another, there is enough energy in the whole thing for it all to work out.  If anything is going to hold the balance for our shared future, I think it will be this, not braininess, not science, not Messiahs, but simple ordinary companionship and generosity, which starts with those we love. 

The generosity of many people over the years has made it possible for me to reach the place where I am now in my life.  I want to pass that on, with these Chronicles, and with hopes of a happier, healthier, more stable world for us all.

This video clip seems a fitting note to close on:



This article (less the video clip) was originally published in Part 5 of Rushleigh ~ The Wasteland Chronicle, under the title 'Holding the balance and passing the torch'.

Friday, 3 February 2012

'What is man, his days are as grass...'

'What is man, his days are as grass.  Though he rise today above the vulgar democratic leaves of grass as high as a towering stalk of fools-parley, tomorrow the scythe of the mower will leave him as low as the dandelion.  What is a social status nowadays?  The wind passeth over it and it is gone, though the place thereof may see it again next summer, even the crown of the cow-parsnip soaring above the herd of green...'

Excerpt from Chapter 13 of "Mr Noon, Part Two" by D. H. Lawrence.

My review of this book can be found in Rushleigh's Entertainment Chronicle: